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The Mures/Caldwells
The Mures/Rowallan
A Genealogy Resource
Rowallan Castle
Caldwell Castle
Rowallan and the Earls of Loudoun
The Scottish Nation:Mure
Ramble Round Kilmarnock

Clan Muir History

This section consists of several different aspects of the history that has brought Clan Muir's and Scotlands' history together. Through the linking to specific families, territories, and historical events, Clan Muir is here acknowledged as one of the true founding & leading historical Clans of Scotland. Clan Muir's heritage is historically accounted for within Scotland's archives forever.

A Detailed List of Clan Muirs History: Clan Muir Timeline

The Royals

The Scottish Nation is generally acknowledged to have come together between the sixth and fourteenth centuries, absorbing several races in the process of creating what certain individuals like to think of as the pure Scot. In fact, there is no such being. The early Scots were a post-Roman Gaelic-speaking people who invaded and settled the west coast, known then as Dalriada, having travelled over the sea from Ireland, and before that, it is fancifully suggested, although not as yet proven, the Middle East. more.jpg


Mure Surname
A surname, the same as More, Muir, and Moore.

The Mures of Rowallan

Timeline of the Chiefs of Clan Mure

The chief of the name in Scotland was Mure of Rowallan, in Ayrshire, whose family, terminating in an heiress, is now represented by the noble family of Loundoun, the head of which is marquis of Hastings in the peerage of Great Britain.

In 1825 was published at Glasgow a work entitled 'The Historie and Descent of the House of Rowallane. By Sir William Mure, knight, of Rowallan, written in, or prior to 1657.' In which it is stated that it was a tradition of their house that they came originally from "the ancient tribe of O'More in Ireland." In a note, the editor, William Muir, says, "The surname 'More' certainly occurs very early in all the three British kingdoms, and is most probably of Celtic origin," and adds, "in most early writings in which the name is found, accordant with the idiomatic usage of Celtic patronymics, the preposition de is omitted, which so invariably accompanies all early Saxon designations." more.jpg

The Mures of Caldwell

Renfrewshire Mures are directly descended from Sir Reginald Mure of Abercorn and Cowdams, who appears to have been chamberlain of Scotland as early as 1329, the first year of the reign of David II. He is supposed to have been the same Reginald whose name appears with that of Gilchrist More in the Ragman Roll, as having sworn fealty to Edward I. in 1296. His paternal inheritance seems to have been Cowdams in Ayrshire, which belonged to him previously to 1326, as an agreement concerning these lands between him and the monks of Paisley is dated in that year.

Mr. Mure of Caldwell is still their feudal superior. Gilchrist More, here mentioned, was Sir Reginald's son. He received the half of the estate of Caldwell on his marriage with the daughter of Caldwell of that ilk. Johannes Mure, jun. de Cowdams, appears in 1446, as one of the commissioners for fixing the boundaries of the burgh of Prestwick, near Ayr. more.jpg

The Mures of Auchindrane

A long flourishing family in the south of Ayrshire. In 1611, John Mure of Auchindrane was accused of the murder of a retainer of Kennedy of Colzean, committed where there were no witnesses, but which was discovered in a remarkable manner. The corpse of the murdered man had been buried in Girvan churchyard, but the laird of Colzean dreaming of him in his sleep, caused his body to be taken up, and insisted on all who lived near to come and touch the corpse. All did so but Auchindrane and his son, whom nobody suspected, till his young daughter, Mary Mure, seeing the crown, went in among them, and when she came near the dead body, the blood sprang from it, on which Auchindrane was apprehended and put to the torture. The Auchindrane Tragedy,' founded on this murder, is one of the dramatic compositions of Sir Walter Scott. more.jpg
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